Author Topic: Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test -chromatic discrimination  (Read 227 times)

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Offline DetroitVinylRob

Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test -chromatic discrimination
« on: March 17, 2020, 12:01:28 pm »
Hey all,

Something fun but also possibly valuable in understanding just how accurate we are at judging possible good hue matches for our product work.

One thing to keep in mind is that the results of this test and your work can only be as accurate as the screen display you are working on, and many  even after a so-called calibration, are not that accurate.

I for one have need to match and create material hues, often from physical samples for many of our customer's renderings.  Perhaps you do too. A possible tip; be sure to utilize full spectrum light if you really have a need to be accurate. Trust me, it will make it substantially easier.

The Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test is one of the most referred to color vision tests available. It belongs to the group of hue discrimination tests, also referred to as arrangement tests.

The aim of the test is to simply arrange the shown color plates in the correct order (fading uniformly from one reference hue to another on either end of each line). Misplacement can point to some sort of color vision deficiency. You’ll find the detailed instructions in the test itself. Give it a try and it would be interesting to share the results.

I found the FM100 Hue Test app on an iPad consistently allowed me a score of 0 over the years (I'm male and nearly 63). While some of our workstations where a bit more difficult and derived imperfect results. A possible cause for concern?

Here is how you can find it: FM100 in the app store. It is free.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2020, 12:04:51 pm by DetroitVinylRob »

Offline Eric Summers

Re: Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test -chromatic discrimination
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2020, 12:48:25 pm »
Thanks for the recommendation Rob! I have to do color matching, sometimes with some very finicky colors. I can fully echo what you said about the full spectrum light; I previously had to rely on the uneven fluorescent lighting in the office which was not easy. Now I have a light on a little flexible arm that I can pull down when I need it. It is much easier to get a good match and takes less time to get there.
At one point I thought about making an HDRI of my workspace for color matching, but the light is a lot less work with better results!

I'll have to give that app a try and post my results (....if they're good ;D).

P.S.
I saw Farnsworth and got excited thinking this might be a Futurama post, until I read the rest of the title. :D

Offline KeyShot

Re: Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test -chromatic discrimination
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2020, 03:27:12 pm »
If you need to match colors inside KeyShot then the color picker can help you. It will find the closest matching colors using a perceptual color space. You can for example click on the photo of a Ferrari and ask for the Pantone colors inside the KeyShot color library that best matches the color of the carpaint.

Offline Eric Summers

Re: Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test -chromatic discrimination
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2020, 10:27:54 am »
If you need to match colors inside KeyShot then the color picker can help you. It will find the closest matching colors using a perceptual color space. You can for example click on the photo of a Ferrari and ask for the Pantone colors inside the KeyShot color library that best matches the color of the carpaint.

Good to know!

Also, didn't download the app but found that X-Rite has a free test here. Luckily I got a 0! :D

Offline Furniture_Guy

Re: Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test -chromatic discrimination
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2020, 10:36:19 am »
If you need to match colors inside KeyShot then the color picker can help you. It will find the closest matching colors using a perceptual color space. You can for example click on the photo of a Ferrari and ask for the Pantone colors inside the KeyShot color library that best matches the color of the carpaint.

Maybe in KeyShot 10 we can have just a plain checkbox in the Print dialog box to embed an sRGB profile in the file? Full color management is overkill but that should be a simple item to add.

Perry (Furniture_Guy)

Offline HaroldL

Re: Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test -chromatic discrimination
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2020, 02:40:43 pm »
That's an interesting test. Scored a 0, not bad for being 69 and one eye close a retinal tear
 Reminds me of the color blindness eye test where you need to discern numbers made up of colored dots in a sea of other colored dots.

Quote from: DetroitVinylRob
While some of our workstations where a bit more difficult and derived imperfect results. A possible cause for concern?
Are all the monitors the same make/model and/or calibrated?

Offline DetroitVinylRob

Re: Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test -chromatic discrimination
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2020, 07:10:55 am »
If you need to match colors inside KeyShot then the color picker can help you. It will find the closest matching colors using a perceptual color space. You can for example click on the photo of a Ferrari and ask for the Pantone colors inside the KeyShot color library that best matches the color of the carpaint.

True and helpful, yet I was speaking of physical sample matching.

Offline DetroitVinylRob

Re: Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test -chromatic discrimination
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2020, 07:33:07 am »
That's an interesting test. Scored a 0, not bad for being 69 and one eye close a retinal tear
 Reminds me of the color blindness eye test where you need to discern numbers made up of colored dots in a sea of other colored dots.

Quote from: DetroitVinylRob
While some of our workstations where a bit more difficult and derived imperfect results. A possible cause for concern?
Are all the monitors the same make/model and/or calibrated?
 
Very impressive HaroldL.

And no they are not. I have both Dells and Viewsonics. The former is surprisingly good for the $$ yet vary from screen to screen, and the later came factory calibrated, is $$$, my largest (27") and very good too, yet just not perfect. I don't mean to run down either. Textures and color depend on scene lighting as we all are aware, matching physical materials to a photo realistic level in a natural light setting is challenging. Everything counts. Perhaps I need to be better at KS too. :)

Offline DetroitVinylRob

Re: Farnsworth-Munsell 100 hue test -chromatic discrimination
« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2020, 07:34:48 am »
If you need to match colors inside KeyShot then the color picker can help you. It will find the closest matching colors using a perceptual color space. You can for example click on the photo of a Ferrari and ask for the Pantone colors inside the KeyShot color library that best matches the color of the carpaint.

Good to know!

Also, didn't download the app but found that X-Rite has a free test here. Luckily I got a 0! :D

Very nice job! and thanx for the additional link