Author Topic: Liquor Bottle - First Render in Life  (Read 1025 times)

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Liquor Bottle - First Render in Life
« on: March 21, 2022, 10:09:07 am »
Hello Everyone, I'd like to know any tips and tricks to improve my render. First time rendering something that will be used for a final visualisation.

Firstly I'd like to thank you all for the tutorials on Instagram from some people and all the answered questions here on the forum, loved this community.
the final product is a Cream liquor as you can see in the picture. Attached is the post-produced photo,

I don't know if it's correct. but I rendered the bottle with the capsule, the liquid, and the label separately. and all of its Clown and Reflections.

after that, used blend modes to control the light in my way. any tips?

Also, I would love to know how can I get more realistic textures doing this label close up on camera... thank you so much




Offline RRIS

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Re: Liquor Bottle - First Render in Life
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2022, 02:40:43 am »
Great result! My only tiny nitpicking remark would be to clean up the reflections on the inside of the neck label in photoshop, it still looks a bit grainy there. A photoshop fix would be much quicker than upping your render samples, as the rest of the bottle looks clean enough.

Offline KimNorris

Re: Liquor Bottle - First Render in Life
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2022, 05:52:07 am »
Very beautiful bottle design & render!  :) Would you tell us, which Instagram tutorial did you follow?

Re: Liquor Bottle - First Render in Life
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2022, 06:57:58 am »
Oh, I followed Esben Oxholm, Shane Spence, Will Gibbons and Liam Martin :)) and thank you so much

Offline Will Gibbons

Re: Liquor Bottle - First Render in Life
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2022, 07:17:47 am »
Hello Everyone, I'd like to know any tips and tricks to improve my render. First time rendering something that will be used for a final visualisation.

Firstly I'd like to thank you all for the tutorials on Instagram from some people and all the answered questions here on the forum, loved this community.
the final product is a Cream liquor as you can see in the picture. Attached is the post-produced photo,

I don't know if it's correct. but I rendered the bottle with the capsule, the liquid, and the label separately. and all of its Clown and Reflections.

after that, used blend modes to control the light in my way. any tips?

Also, I would love to know how can I get more realistic textures doing this label close up on camera... thank you so much

Awesome job! I think the bottle looks a bit dark for a marketing shot. Whenever we render things on black, it's easy to make the product too dark. Just for an experiment, replace the black background with white and you'll see what I mean. The right side of the bottle is a bit too dark I think. I'd boost exposure slightly and like RRIS said, I'd touch up the reflection a bit. Since It's pretty common to make reflections and such stylized so they look even more perfect than they really are.

Nice work!

Offline Josh3D

Re: Liquor Bottle - First Render in Life
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2022, 01:38:12 pm »
Welcome, Felippe! You're in good hands here - some great feedback. Looking forward to seeing the update.

Offline DT

Re: Liquor Bottle - First Render in Life
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2022, 11:57:55 am »
Very nice!  The serial numbers (666  ;D) on the bottle is a nice touch.

The comp looks great, but why render the liquid and label separate from the bottle? 

You may have, but I always have a white background when lighting. 

Placing an Area Light directly behind the bottle like an Absolut Vodka ad would give the liquid some translucency.

There's some banding in the liquid, adding 1.5-2% noise will help smooth it out. 

Adding wrinkles to the plastic over the cap would add to the realism.

The label bump on the gold is a little large and deep IMO - the noise on the left side is distracting and appears chunky. 

Using Multi-Layer Optics for the glass and playing with the IOR provides more control over the reflections and refractions.

 The way that the left side highlight wraps around the bottom of the glass looks unnatural.  I'd flatten the environment or use a "Half" Pin Light for a flat horizon.

Edit- I had a question about the Multi-Layer Optics comment above and I may have misspoken, so I'm posting screenshots comparing glass and multi-layer optics for clarity and reference.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2022, 08:15:50 am by DT »