Author Topic: Diesel Engine  (Read 3159 times)

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Offline NormanHadley

Diesel Engine
« on: August 19, 2010, 01:11:58 am »
Another project for a forthcoming trade exhibition. I'm having this one printed as a 3m x 2m banner on a fabric called Trevira. The Keyshot image is a tad too large to upload at over 200 megapixels - this is a scaled down version.

With a little help from Thomas Teger, I set all the materials to the same (ctrl-A inside the scene tree - easy when you know how..), then placed the model inside the Luxion conference room to get plenty of warmth into the image.

Offline Speedster

Re: Diesel Engine
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2010, 07:25:53 am »
Absolutely stunning!  A very creative departure from having all the components in their "real" materials- this will be a show-stopper.  The modeling is among the best I've seen, and I know full well the hard work and time it takes to push a model to this level of excellence.  Please, show us more!
Bill G

Offline NormanHadley

Re: Diesel Engine
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2010, 02:55:33 am »
Thanks, Bill - that's a heartening response. I've really had fun with setting a single material - it concentrates the eye on the product as a whole rather than a collection of disparate bits.

I've also experimented with glass - the results are interesting but, because the geometry is so complex, the finished image comes out more opaque than you might think. I guess we're used to only thin layers of the stuff separating us from our beer. En masse, it's pretty dark stuff - like when divers tell you it all goes dark at any appreciable depth of apparently clear water.

I can't upload an image because the site keeps telling me the upload folder is full (strange because other people are uploading stuff). But there's an early version here http://technomot.com/common/Brochure.pdf.

Offline Speedster

Re: Diesel Engine
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2010, 07:41:24 am »
Your Technomot brochure is a great example of KeyShot in use.  What a great tool!

Just for grins, you may want to play around with "X-ray", a seldom used and greatly misunderstood material.  I have used it on almost every client project for almost two years.  It's very flexible, and offers visual impact very different than glass- great for illustrative purposes.  Here's an example...

Bill G