KeyShot Forum

Technical discussions => Animation => Topic started by: cash68 on January 13, 2021, 01:26:18 pm

Title: Workflow for multiple animations
Post by: cash68 on January 13, 2021, 01:26:18 pm
So I am pretty good  at animation in keyshot.... however, still don't have an answer to this.  Let's say I want to do 3 shots:

A turntable/zoom, a macro shot across the interface, and a dramatic top view that spins into a profile view.  Right?  Right.

So I make 3 cameras, since the views need to start in 3 different places.  I set up the animation and move the model and the camera to get the shot right.

Then I click on the next camera, but some of the animations are still showing.  I don't need them, so I delete them, but now it's fucked up my first animation.

How do you set up multiple different animations in one scene without destroying previous animations?
Title: Re: Workflow for multiple animations
Post by: INNEO_MWo on January 13, 2021, 11:01:29 pm
You can work with model sets and use the studio switch event.
Title: Re: Workflow for multiple animations
Post by: cash68 on January 14, 2021, 07:18:57 am
But it's only one model.   So duplicate it to make multiple sets of the same model?
Title: Re: Workflow for multiple animations
Post by: INNEO_MWo on January 14, 2021, 07:38:29 am
jepp - exactly. So every model set provide own animations and you don't have to delete the other to 'f..... up' your scene.
With studios you can get all things together and you can use the studio switch event to render one animation.

IMHO I would create several animation parts and compose them in post. (but that's another story)


Hope that helps


Cheers
Marco
Title: Re: Workflow for multiple animations
Post by: andy.engelkemier on January 15, 2021, 05:04:15 am
I agree with the "compose them in post" idea, but there is an advantage to being able to send them all at once also.

Also, an advantage of doing it this way, is since it's in a different studio, you can switch the environment as well. If you're moving the camera from turntable, to macro, to ui, chances are, that same lighting isn't working well for all those shots. So doing it that way lets you light each shot with a new environment.