Author Topic: HDRI Domes vs. Just a 360 Image  (Read 873 times)

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Offline figure1a

HDRI Domes vs. Just a 360 Image
« on: October 14, 2019, 05:18:03 pm »
Just pondering the necessity of an HDRI dome in a certain situation. If I were to shoot a backplate on a nice sunny day with a normal exposure and then use a 360 camera like a GoPro Fusion and shoot a 360 dome of the same scene with the same exposure, would there be any noticeable advantage to shooting and using a traditional HDRI dome (which I usually shoot with a Nikon D850 bracketed to cover everything from bright white to absolute black)? I feel like just a regular 360 dome would be fine as Keyshot would have the reflections of the scene at the same exposure as the backplate and also know where the sun is for lighting.

Offline RRIS

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Re: HDRI Domes vs. Just a 360 Image
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2019, 12:00:48 am »
The problem is, you still have this limited exposure range, which means that if you will end up with gray whites if you turn down the brightness and washed out (dodged?) mids if you over expose. The limited dynamic range will give your object a very even/dull illumination, lacking any definition in the shadows. You don't have this issue with (quality) hdri's.
Of course you can solve this by positioning light pins in the environment editor where the bright areas are in your environment (or work with geometry lights, which you can hide, but won't move with your environment if you would rotate it for example).

Offline figure1a

Re: HDRI Domes vs. Just a 360 Image
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2019, 08:04:38 pm »
The problem is, you still have this limited exposure range, which means that if you will end up with gray whites if you turn down the brightness and washed out (dodged?) mids if you over expose. The limited dynamic range will give your object a very even/dull illumination, lacking any definition in the shadows. You don't have this issue with (quality) hdri's.
Of course you can solve this by positioning light pins in the environment editor where the bright areas are in your environment (or work with geometry lights, which you can hide, but won't move with your environment if you would rotate it for example).
Thanks for the insight. Makes sense.