Author Topic: Camera Texture - How to select different camera than view camera?  (Read 4229 times)

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Offline richbobo

I'd like to bump this topic - https://www.keyshot.com/forum/index.php?topic=24495.msg107299#msg107299

Is there any way to specify and lock a Texture Map camera that is different than the current View camera?

I don't want my map to move with respect to the model when I move the viewer camera. There are many uses for this technique and I would love to have it in my bag of tricks for KeyShot!

Thanks for any help.
Rich

Offline INNEO_MWo

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Re: Camera Texture - How to select different camera than view camera?
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2020, 10:33:40 pm »
What is the difference between a „locked camera projection“ and a planar mapping from the same view direction/vector?
Does a camera mapping really calcs the perspective distortion?

Offline Eugen Fetsch

Re: Camera Texture - How to select different camera than view camera?
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2020, 05:38:01 am »
What is the difference between a „locked camera projection“ and a planar mapping from the same view direction/vector?
Does a camera mapping really calcs the perspective distortion?
planar mapping does not work if the camera moves ;)

Offline richbobo

Re: Camera Texture - How to select different camera than view camera?
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2020, 08:03:04 pm »
Here's a KeyShot re-creation of a test I put together a couple of years ago in Nuke, using camera projection mapping.

The "SurrattHouse" image was a photo I found online. I did a camera match in Nuke and recreated a very simple model of the shape of the house. Using Nuke's camera projection node, I was able to get a decent mapping of the source image onto my model. In Nuke, I could just duplicate the texture projection camera and animate the copy as my view camera. The texture stayed mapped to the house, while the view camera could move. Obviously, you can only move within a limited range of motion before the illusion is destroyed, since you'll see stretched pixels and missing information on the sides. But, with a bit of retouching work in parts of the texture map image - and careful choreography of the view camera, you can get a very convincing scene!

And, no, you can't do this with planar mapping. You need mapping of the pixels using the original camera's focal length, angle of view, distance from the objects, etc. - a recreation of the physical layout.

The only thing missing in KeyShot is the ability to separate the mapping camera from the viewing camera.