Author Topic: Another Model T  (Read 3579 times)

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Offline Speedster

Another Model T
« on: April 29, 2010, 06:10:44 pm »
Well, I'm a glutton for punishment!  Here's my new 1913 Ford Model T "Delivery Truck".  Fourth in my planned series of six models.  SolidWorks, with ForestRoad HDRI.  Backplate is mine at Fallbrook Park.

Bruce Parrish is a close friend and car nut, who specializes in custom race car body fabrication, like NASCAR, Nissan, etc.  "Gould's Market" is named for my grandfather's meat market, founded in the late 19th Century.

Oh ya- before you all scream at me, the tires are correct!  They used mostly "White Rubber", with no tread, in the 1909-1913 period.  Very slippery on damp cobblestone roads, especially with tiny mechanical brakes on the rear only!

Bill G
www.GouldStudios.com

Offline Richman

Re: Another Model T
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2010, 07:36:58 pm »
Nice work.  as always..

Do you have any techniques / textures for "heat patina exhaust pipes" material? 

Offline Speedster

Re: Another Model T
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2010, 08:14:02 am »
Quote
Do you have any techniques / textures for "heat patina exhaust pipes" material? 

I've mulled this for quite awhile.  I presume you mean the "chrome > blue" blend, like on a Harley exhaust pipe?  If you can photograph an excellent example, say at a bike or car show, you should be able to get it close, using the jpeg and standard material tweaks in KS.

Now, I have not yet tried this next idea, but it may be the best choice.  Lock the camera!!!  Make multiple rendering passes, the first being the hero shot.   Then paint everything except the exhaust pipe geometry for a "clown" pass.  I would use just one flat color for everything except the pipe, and render with no backplate or ground shadows.  Don't change your lighting settings!  Render the clown pass.  Then apply perhaps a "gun metal" dark blue chrome to the pipe, make another pass (with the clown), then perhaps lighten it up a bit and make another render.  Do as many tweak renders as you need, as it will render fast if most is a clown.

Anyway, bring all these renders as layers into Photoshop using the "Place" command (a must!), then link them all.  Then it should be possible to selectively "airbrush erase" portions of each layer, first using the clown pass to select>inverse select to isolate just the pipe as you work on each layer.

Hope this makes sense, and I think it would work well.  Post an example!  I'll try it myself soon.

Bill G