Author Topic: Magnifing Glass  (Read 3527 times)

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Offline Speedster

Magnifing Glass
« on: August 09, 2010, 06:21:11 pm »
Hi all;

Starting a new optical design project for a client, so I wanted to see what role KeyShot2 may play in the project.  Just a simple magnifing glass in SolidWorks, not properly engineered, as it's just a test.  Happy so far!  It sure teaches you a lot about IOR! Cemented doublets will be more interesting, I'm sure.

FYI: The "scale" (ruler) is my freebie on TurboSquid- just search Gould Studios. 

Bill G
www.GouldStudios.com

Offline Ed

Re: Magnifing Glass
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2010, 10:57:34 pm »
Nice effect Bill. 

Hmmm... maybe I should try making a magnifier, place it outside the field of view, and focus intense light onto the diamond in a ring.  Might be a way to light up the stone without blowing out the metal ring shank.  It's a trick photographers use.

Ed

Offline Speedster

Re: Magnifing Glass
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2010, 07:47:26 am »
Hi Ed;

Funny how this simple test started the ideas flowing.  I was thinking the same thing, but I'm not into diamonds,  My wife sure is! 

Anyway, what would the effects be of a fresnel lens?  What if you made a cell, with a focusing lens and a separate "disc" of emmissive material?  Emmissives, not being focused, do not throw shadows.  But if it was focused, perhaps it would?  In effect, we would create a "virtual studio lamp" that could be used for spot lighting, maybe even with barn doors!

I have created an old-fashioned "tent" lighting rig that I use for highly reflective objects and small products, just like we used to do in real photography.  A big ring, with any kind of transluscent material applied to simulate the sheet styrene I used to use.  Instead of cutting a viewport in the side, I just bring the camera inside.  Works best with a strong, single source "light" I create in HDR-Studio. A large half-dome also works, but can get a bit strange.  Crystal, Frosted Glass and various plastic work well.  I'll share some of these images when I can, as the existing models are under NDA's.

BTW, be sure to apply flat black to the edge of the lens to control internal reflections.

So, the mind soars with KeyShot.  Funny how the KS team works their tails off so we can play!

Bill G

Offline Ed

Re: Magnifing Glass
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2010, 09:46:18 am »
It would be very interesting to experiment and post images of various lighting rigs.  I have HDR Light Studio as well.

I have experimented with curved, metallic reflectors to add light to an object and influence the color of the polished metal object.  As with photography, you're not taking a photo of the polished metal object, but rather taking a photo of what it reflects.

I have not had good luck using emmissive material as an actual light source for the scene.  They seem to work best for lamps and LEDs in dimmer scenes.

The lens idea for making a spot lamp sounds promising.  If you can power it with an emmissive disk, great. A focused spot, kind of like the snoot on my studio strobe. You could even add colored gels and show/hide them as needed.

Ed